End of blog

“When we reach the top,” Farisa said, “it’ll be worth it.”

Raqel was out of breath. Both girls had been trudging through snow since noon and it was only getting deeper as they climbed.

“You’ve never been up there?”

“Not in winter, Farisa. I’m a city girl.”

The peak was barely a hundred feet above, but each way up looked as treacherous as any other: snow and rock, mostly snow.

“Follow me,” Farisa said. “I know the path.”

“My hands are freezing.”

Reaching the summit exposed them to a fierce northerly wind. In its brief spells of rest, Raqel could hear farm dogs, baying in the shaded valley.

“It’s so cold! The lakes are frozen, the roads covered, the trees all bare–”

“Ay,” Farisa said, “and winter means you see farther. Farther than anyone. Farther than you would have ever known.”

Advertisements

20 thoughts on “End of blog

    • 1. I’ve been killing social media accounts over the past year and my concentration has improved. I can actually read books again. I prefer it this way.

      2. I dislike having a public presence or reputation, positive or otherwise. I “won” a certain game, but now I’m ready to move on.

      3. I prefer the long-form format of books and polished essays over the timeliness and short length that is necessary for blog posts.

      4. I’m no longer interested in startups and tech-industry hot topics. I still follow technology, but I’m more interested in certain highly technical subfields these days.

  1. I appreciate all you’ve done for us over the years — much of your writing is amazing.

    Do you have strong opinions on whether I can share “de-published” posts? Some of them are amazing.

  2. I bonded with a colleague at a pretty shitty (but “rocketship growth!!1!”) startup over your essays like the Gervais principle one, which we were kind of living at the time. I think you spoke for a lot of us. Not that it should be your burden.

    Thanks for continuing to share your insight, whatever form it might take (https://lobste.rs/c/ofcrvk).

  3. I know that I speak for many others when I say how much I always looked forward to reading a new blogpost of yours and how much of a difference your perceptive insights made. We are all grateful. Best of luck in your new endeavors!

  4. Michael,

    Your writing was invaluable over the years. After your site went down, I crawled the web archives and put everything into a Kindle book (not for publication, obviously.) I have gifted it to co-workers I care about. Thank you so much for your insights.

    I know this may seem out of left field, but God loves you very much. I leave you with a quote from Augustine of Hippo:

    “Thou hast made us for thyself, O Lord, and our heart is restless until it finds its rest in thee.”

  5. do you have any advice for smart devs that feel lost in this industry? other than cutting expenses and investing in index funds.

    • It depends on what’s making you feel lost.

      Programming is still a valuable skill, and if you enjoy it but just can’t stand the bullshit that comes along with the corporate environment, leaving private-sector VC-funded tech doesn’t mean that you need to give up programming. But you’ll probably want either to go into research, government, or start your own business.

      If it’s a dislike for programming in general, that’s harder.

  6. Thanks so much for all you have done. Best luck with your new endeavor. Hopefully our paths shall cross each other again. In case you are interested in machine learning, I happen to have some experience and will be more than happy to chat.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s