XWP vs. JAP

The software industry is a fascinating place. As programmers, we have the best and worst job in the world. What we do is so rewarding and challenging that many of us have been doing it for free since we were eight. We’re paid to think, and to put pure logic into systems that effectively do our bidding. And yet, we have (as a group) extremely low job satisfaction. We don’t last long: our half-life is about six years. By 30, most of us have decided that we want to do something else: management, quantitative finance, or startup entrepreneurship. It’s not programming itself that drives us out, but the ways in which the “programmer” job has been restructured out of our favor. It’s been shaved down, mashed, melted and molded into commodity grunt work, except for the top 2 percent or so of our field (for whom as much time is spent establishing that one is, in fact, in the top 2 percent, as is spent working). Most of us have to sit in endless meetings, follow orders that make no sense, and maintain legacy code with profanity such as “VisitorFactoryFactory” littered about, until we move “into management”, often landing in a role that is just as tedious but carries (slightly) more respect.

I’m reaching a conclusion, and it’s not a pleasant one, about our industry and what one has to do to survive it. My definition of “survive” entails progress, because while it’s relatively easy to coast, engineers who plateau are just waiting to get laid off, and will usually find that demand for their (increasingly out of date) skills has declined. Plainly put, there’s a decision that programmers have to make if they want to get better. Why? Because you only get better if you get good projects, and you only get good projects if you know how to play the game. Last winter, I examined the trajectory of software engineers, and why it seems to flat-line so early. The conclusion I’ve come to is that there are several ceilings, three of which seem visible and obvious, and each requires a certain knack to get past it. Around 0.7 to 0.8 there’s the “weed out” effect that’s  rooted in intellectual limitations: inability to grasp pointers, recursion, data in sets, or other intellectual concepts people need to understand if they’re going to be adequate programmers. Most people who hit this ceiling do so in school, and one hopes they don’t become programmers. The next ceiling, which is where the archetypical “5:01″ mediocrities live, is around 1.2. This is where you finish up if you just follow orders, don’t care about “functional programming” because you can’t see how it could possibly apply to your job, and generally avoid programming outside of an office context.

The next ceiling is around 1.8, and it’s what I intend to discuss. The 0.7 ceiling is a problem of inability, and at 1.2 it’s an issue of desire and willingness. There are a lot of programmers who don’t have a strong desire to get any better than average. Average is employable, middle-class, comfortable. That keeps a lot of people complacent around 1.2. The ceiling at 1.8, on the other hand, comes from the fact that it’s genuinely hard to get allocated 1.8+ level work, which usually involves technical and architectural leadership. In most companies, there are political battles that the projects’ originators must fight to get them on the map, and others that engineers must involve themselves in if they want to get on to the best projects. It’s messy and hard and ugly and it’s the kind of process that most engineers hate.

Many engineers at the 1.7 to 1.8 level give up on engineering progress and take this ceiling as a call to move into management. It’s a lot harder to ensure a stream of genuinely interesting work than it is to take a middle management position. The dream is that the managerial position will allow the engineer to allocate the best technical work to himself and delegate the crap. The reality is that he’s lucky if he gets 10 hours per week of coding time in, and that managers who cherry-pick the good work and leave the rest to their subordinates are often despised and therefore ineffective.

This said, there’s an idea here, and it deserves attention. The sudden desire to move into management occurs when engineers realize that they won’t progress by just doing their assigned work, and that they need to hack the project allocation process if they want to keep getting better. Managerial authority seems like the most direct route to this because, after all, it’s managers who assign the projects. The problem with that approach is that managerial work requires an entirely different skill set, and that while this is a valid career, it’s probably not what one should pursue if one wants to get better as a software engineer.

How does one hack project allocation? I’m going to introduce a couple terms. The first is J.A.P.: “Just A Programmer”. There are a lot of people in business who see programming as commodity work: that’s why most of our jobs suck. This is a self-perpetuating cycle: because of such peoples’ attitudes toward programmers, good engineers leave them, leaving them with the bad, and reinforcing their perception that programming is order-following grunt work that needs to be micromanaged or it won’t be done right at all. Their attitude toward the software engineer is that she’s “just a programmer”. Hence the term. There’s a related cliche in the startup world involving MBA-toting “big-picture guys” who “just need a programmer” to do all the technical work in exchange for a tiny sliver of the equity. What they get, in return, is rarely quality.

Worse yet for the business side, commodity programmers aren’t 90 or 70 or 50 percent as valuable as good engineers, but 5 to 10 percent as useful, if that. The major reason for this is that software projects scale horribly in terms of the number of people involved with them. A mediocre engineer might be 20 percent as effective, measured individually, as a good one, but four mediocre engineers will only be about 35 percent (not 100) as effective as a single good engineer.

Good programmers dread the “Just A Programmer” role in which they’re assessed on the quantity of code they crank out rather than the problems they solve and the quality of their solutions, and they avoid such positions especially because commodity-programmer roles tend to attract ineffective programmers, and effective people who have to work with ineffective programmers become, themselves, ineffective.

This said, a 1.8 engineer is not a “commodity programmer”. At this level, we’re talking about people who are probably in the top 2 or 3 percent of the software industry. We’re talking about people who, in a functioning environment, will deliver high-quality and far-reaching software solutions reliably. They can start from scratch and deliver an excellent “full-stack” solution. (In a dysfunctional environment, they’ll probably fail if they don’t quit first.)  The political difficulty, and it can be extreme, lies with the fact that it’s very difficult for a good engineer to reliably establish (especially to non-technical managers, and to those managers’ favorites who may not be technically strong) that she is good. It turns out that, even if it’s true, you can’t say to your boss, “I’m a top-2% engineer and deserve more autonomy and the best projects” and expect good results. You have to show it, but you can’t show it unless you get good projects.

What this means, in fewer words, is that it’s very difficult for a software engineer to prove he’s not a commodity programmer without hacking the politics. Perversely, many software environments can get into a state where engineering skill becomes negatively correlated with political success. For example, if the coding practices are “best practices”, “design pattern”-ridden Java culture, with FactoryVisitorSingletonSelection patterns all over the place, bad engineers have an advantage on account of being more familiar with damaged software environments, and because singleton directories called “com” don’t piss them off as much (since they never venture outside of an IDE anyway).

Software wants to be a meritocracy, but the sad reality is that effectiveness of an individual programmer depends on the environment. Drop a 1.8+ engineer into a Visitor-infested Java codebase and he turns into a bumbling idiot, in the same way that an incompetent player at a poker table can fluster experts (who may not be familiar with that particular flavor of incompetence). The result of this is that detecting who the good programmers are, especially for a non-programmer or an inept one, is extremely difficult, if not impossible. The 1.7 to 1.8 level is where software engineers realize that, in spite of their skill, they won’t be recognized as having it unless they can ensure a favorable environment and project allocation, and that it’s next to impossible to guarantee these benefits in the very long run without some kind of political advantage. Credibility as a software engineer alone won’t cut it, because you can’t establish that creativity unless you get good projects.

Enter the “X.W.P.” distinction, which is the alternative to being a “J.A.P.” It means an “X Who Programs”, where X might be an entrepreneur, a researcher, a data scientist, a security specialist, a quant, or possibly even a manager. If you’re an XWP, you can program, and quite possibly full-time, but you have an additional credibility that is rooted in something other than software engineering. Your work clearly isn’t commodity work; you might have a boss, but he doesn’t believe he could do your job better than you can. XWP is the way out. But you also get to code, so it’s the best of both worlds.

This might seem perverse and unusual. At 1.8, the best way to continue improving as a software engineer is not to study software engineering. You might feel like there’s still a lot to learn in that department, and you’re right, but loading up on unrecognized skill is not going to get you anywhere. It leads to bitterness and slow decline. You need something else.

One might think that an XWP is likely to grow as an X but not as a software engineer, but I don’t think that’s necessarily true. There certainly are quants and data scientists and entrepreneurs and game designers who remain mediocre programmers, but they don’t have to. If they want to become good engineers, they have an advantage over vanilla software engineers on account of the enhanced respect accorded their role. If a Chief Data Scientist decides that building a distributed system is the best way to solve a machine learning problem, and he’s willing to roll his sleeves up and write the code, the respect that this gives him will allow him to take the most interesting engineering work. This is how you get 1.8 and 2.1 and 2.4-level engineering work. You start to bill yourself as something other than a software engineer and get the respect that entitles you to projects that will make you better. You find an X and become an X, but you also know your way around a computer. You’re an X, and you know how to code, and your “secret weapon” (secret because management in most companies won’t recognize it) is that you’re really good at it, too.

This, perhaps, is the biggest surprise I’ve encountered in the bizarre world that is the software engineering career. I am so much without words that I’ll use someone else’s, from A Song of Ice and Fire: To go west, you must first go east.

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15 thoughts on “XWP vs. JAP

  1. Yes, unfortunately, a lot of us get jaded at 1.8 and decide that the 1.2 level is more suitable after the fight has been beaten out of us, the passion driven away, and the love gone.

    Love your posts. You hit it on the nail every single time. Unfortunately, I’ve seen XWPs being treated like JAPs way too often. It may have been your blog or perhaps another one that said roughly, “software engineering is not a career because it has no place for non-managerial advancement.” While this maybe a way out for some, the underlying problems you describe will unfortunately continue to plague the industry until people wise up (probably never).

    I’ve noticed a lot of this comes from managers not being technical, from engineers (who rarely have the skills for management) taking managerial roles, and especially from managers who hire engineers that are more skilled and smarter than they are, then despising their own hires. That last one is a killer.

    Yup, I write fantastic prose… Maybe one day, I’ll be writing that for a living.

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  4. I agree with your blog post 110%! As someone currently in the JAP category, I have come to realize that XWP is the way to go for me. I’m not too keen on going into management and as I get older I see a dead end as a JAP in the web programming space where technologies are changing seemingly every nanosecond.

    I will go one step further though and say that XWP is probably the future. I think there are a large number of people in the JAP category who are there because programming is considered a discipline unto itself, with its own career path. JAP people are working on applications that require knowledge in other areas because a project needs programmers and there are too few XWPs around to fill in. Those projects end up requiring people from other disciplines to consult with, or the guy who is JAP ends up ‘making do’ with the knowledge he has on the subject (to me this is like putting a round peg in a square hole). In the web programming space, the JAP career path exists because of the overwhelming number of technologies that someone has to stay on top of to remain competitive.

    Just picking a technology stack for a particular web application can be a mind numbing experience in itself, let alone having to learn all of the technologies in the stack. This makes someone who is an XWP a rare person indeed. However, as the technologies used to do web programming converges to a smaller set of standards, it’s more likely for say an accountant to learn web programming. I’m not saying this will be happening anytime soon, but it will eventually happen when some small set of technologies becomes ‘just good enough’ for almost any web application one would want to create.

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